Japan is Kyoto – Part 2 Kiyomizudera Temple

I went really early to Kiyomizudera Temple to avoid the huge crowd but as expected, the place was already filled with tourists. This temple is one of the most popular temples in Japan and the most popular in Kyoto. When I went down the bus, I already saw people walking in groups so I just followed them as I know they are all going up to the temple. Although I look very Korean, you can’t deny that I also look very Japanese and my hair color at that time was red so as usual, people stopped me many times to ask for directions.

It was an 8- 10 minute uphill walk. The weather was really nice so I didn’t bother walking. I stopped by a store to grabe some mini donuts and coffee.

 

 

The sloping street leading up to Kiyomizu-dera is called Kiyomizu-zaka. Saw them along the way. There are lots of restaurants and cafes serving traditional Japanese food. 

There are also lots of shops selling traditional Japanese art and ceramics

Lovebirds in Japanese Traditional Outfit

Matcha Ice Cream

At the end of the street is Nio-mon gate which houses two Nio guardians. Nio-zo, or wooden statues of the temple guardians, are enshrined at each side of the gate. 

While on my way up to the Nio mon gate, I looked back and saw this. And no, this is not the most accurate photo depicting the number of people coming to the temple.

You can rent Kimonos or Yukatas near the Temple. They are quite costly though but it will be nice taking photos wearing it.

You will lots of students in groups. They are on a school trip I guess.

View from the Main Temple 

I did exactly what they were doing. They say the smoke has healing properties!

Who does not love autumn? I was a bit early. Kyoto’s peak is usually end of November. The three-storied Koyasu Pagoda stands among the trees in the far southern end of the temple grounds, and a visit is said to bring about an easy and safe childbirth.

 

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Under the main hall is the Otowa waterfall, which is said to have water with wish-granting powers. This waterfall is the very reason for Kiyomizu-dera’s name – “Pure Water Temple”. Its waters are divided into three separate streams, and visitors use cups attached to long poles to drink from them. Each stream’s water is said to have a different benefit, namely to cause longevity, success at school and a fortunate love life. However, drinking from all three streams is considered greedy ( I didn’t drink! LOL)

   

Prayers and Wishes are written on these boards

On the left side is the way going to Jishu-jinja, a shrine dedicated to the deity of love and matchmaking.

In the shrine are love stones.  If you successfully find your way from one stone to another with your eyes shut, you will be lucky in finding love. If you are unable to do it, they say it will take long for your love to be realized, so I didn’t do it LOL. You can also have someone guide you from one stone to the other, but that is interpreted to mean that an intermediary will be needed in your love life as well.

 

 

I have 200 photos of Kiyomizudera’s wooden stage on my phone.  on my phone.  From this angle, you can see Kyoto Tower from afar. I stopped at this area and stayed for 20 minutes asking people to take photos of me with this view in different angles. Look at the crowd!

The view from the other side. Spell Beautiful! Nature and all its glory!

I’m with them LOL

Kiyomizu-dera’s wooden stage and main hall were built without the use of nails… and they’re still perfectly standing until now, after 600+ years.

I wanted to eat but the restaurant was packed.

No wonder Japanese people don’t gain weight. You can find lots of long stairs like this in South Korea too!

a lovely view of Kyoto!

The Otowa Waterfall up close Its waters are divided into three separate streams, and visitors use cups attached to long poles to drink from them. Each stream’s water is said to have a different benefit, namely to cause longevity, success at school and a fortunate love life. However, drinking from all three streams is considered greedy.

Pagoda

I spent 3 hours here and time to go to another place!

On my way down 

 

 

I went back to Kiyomizudera in the evening to see the illumination. The places was more packed!

 

 

 

 

They can write your name in Japanese or Nihonggo. I have a video of this but I lost it along with my 9000 photos of Japan.

There were lots of people taking their photos with this lantern lol

It is best to see the illumination during the last week of November.

 

How to go to Kiyomizudera:

Kiyomizudera can be reached from Kyoto Station by bus number 100 or 206 (15 minutes, 230 yen). Get off at Gojo-zaka or Kiyomizu-michi bus stop, and as I have mentioned earlier, it will be aan 8-10 minute uphill walk to the temple. Alternatively, Kiyomizudera is about a 20 minute walk from Kiyomizu-Gojo Station along the Keihan Railway Line.

Opening Times 

6:00 to 18:00 (until 18:30 on weekends and holidays from mid April through July and everyday in August and September)

Closed

No closing days

Admission

400 yen

Spring and Fall Illumination

Hours

18:00 to 21:00 during Hanatoro around mid March, from late March to mid April and from mid November to early December (from 17:30 during the autumn)

Admission

400 yen

About The Author

camillearoundtheworld@gmail.com

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